Steve Livingston

Media, Public & International Affairs Professor, George Washington University
Steve Livingston

Steven Livingston is Professor of Media and Public Affairs and International Affairs at The George Washington University and a Senior Fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University. He studies the role of technology in politics and policy processes, including human rights monitoring, disinformation campaigns, governance, and the provisioning of public goods.Among other publications, Livingston has written When the Press Fails: Political Power and the News Media from Iraq to Katrina(W. Lance Bennett and Regina Lawrence, co-authors) (University of Chicago Press, 2007); Bits and Atoms: Information and Communication Technology in Areas of Limited Statehood(Gregor Walter-Drop) (Oxford University Press, 2014). Africa’s Evolving Infosystems: A Pathway to Security and Stability(NDU Press, 2011) and Africa’s Information Revolution: Implications for Crime, Policing, and Citizen Security(NDU Press, 2013). Livingston has lectured at the National Defense University, the Army War College, the Strategic Studies Group at the Naval War College, the Brookings Institution, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the U.S. Institute for Peace, European Institute of Diplomacy, Vienna, the Foreign Service Institute, the U.S. Department of State, and at universities and think tanks in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. He has appeared on CNN, CNNI, ABC, CBC, BBC, NPR, al Jazeera and many other news organizations commenting on public policy and politics. He has also been quoted in The Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, The Economist, among other newspapers around the world. He has also written for Newsday, USA Today, and La Stampain Rome. His research and consulting activities have taken him to over50 countries since 2006.

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